Waiting for Spring to Fix Hail Damage?

Over 100,000 Coloradans were affected by hail damage this year, leading to insurance carrier and supply chain backlogs that left thousands of people unable to have their restoration work completed before the onset of winter. While it is a common practice to plan exterior projects for Spring, there are factors to consider that most people don’t realize until it is too late. Following a large hail event, these conditions are heavily influenced by your insurance carrier and the contractor that you select. In order for a qualified contractor to schedule the correct scope of hail damage restoration work, the insurance claim must first be settled.

Many people don’t know about the deadlines within their insurance policies. Most policies have a 12-month cutoff from the date of loss (storm event) to have all work completed and invoiced in order for all funds to be paid (depreciation is only recoverable if it is incurred before the deadline). This means, for example, that if it hail storm happened May of 2017 and your project isn’t completely finished by May 2018, most insurance carriers will not have to pay the withheld depreciation, potentially leaving you stuck with thousands of dollars of additional out-of-pocket expense.

If you own a property that sustained hail damage but were not able to get work done yet, you may have been advised to wait for Spring weather conditions rather than moving forward. While this may be the ideal time to plan the work to be done, it may not be possible if you wait until Spring to choose a contractor and begin the insurance claim resolution process. This process can take months, especially if the insurance carrier is backed up and requires a re-inspection of the property. By allowing your contractor to start the supplement process now, you can plan the installation to be at a time of your choosing. At Advanced Exteriors, Inc., we believe that you should be in charge of the timeline of your project. By getting started now, this can happen without being restricted by factors outside of your control, and with a less stressful experience overall.